Membership Spotlight – Mollye Dietrich

On a continuous basis, IABC Nashville spotlights its diverse members through a Q&A feature. We are pleased to showcase Mollye Dietrich, an instructional designer at HCA.

mollye-dietrich_hcaIABC: What is your background?

Molly: I was born and raised in Nashville, TN (yes, I am not a “transplant!”). I went to Franklin High School, then attended the University of Tennessee-Knoxville for college (and am a HUGE Vols fan!). I received a Bachelor of Science in Service Management with a major in Retail and Consumer Science, and a minor in Business Administration. I moved back to Nashville the day after I graduated in 2011, and haven’t left again since.

IABC: How did you get started in this business?

Molly: My first job in Nashville after college was in retail (since that is what I studied in undergrad), but I quickly realized that this was not a long-term career for me, although I love everything about fashion. I decided to move to a job in IT sales, which I also soon realized wasn’t the right fit for me either. A friend of mine knew that I was unhappy with my job, and encouraged me to apply for something completely out of my comfort zone, which happened to be the best decision I ever made. I started with HCA (Hospital Corporation of America) in 2012 as an Implementation Specialist, traveling to different hospitals across the U.S implementing our paperless Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems. After that, I was an Assistant Project Manager for a short period of time and learned all of the ropes of a project from beginning to end, including the communications and education role of a project. I decided that I wanted to try something a little more creative, and interviewed for an Instructional Designer position, and here I am today!

IABC: What is your current position and business affiliation? How long have you been in this role?

Molly: My current role is an Instructional Designer with HCA. I have been in this position for almost 2 years, however, I have been with HCA for almost 5 years. As an ID, I create communication and education deliverables for different projects across my specific department at HCA, the Clinical Services Group (CSG). This includes (to name a few) web-based training courses, communication and marketing strategies, branding, toolkits, brochures, posters, facilitator and learner guides, podcasts, and tip-sheets.

IABC: What makes your business/organization stand out?

Molly: HCA is the biggest healthcare company in the world, with ownership of over 165 hospitals and 115 surgery centers in the U.S and London, England, as well as over 205,000 employees. With a company this large, it seems that it would be easy to get “lost in the shuffle.” However, that is not the case at HCA. Every employee is treated with dignity and respect, and their work portrays the mission and values of HCA everyday – “Above all else, we are committed to the care and improvement of human life.” It is also amazing to me how involved in the community the organization is, especially since the corporate office is right here in Nashville. There are so many local non-profits that I have gotten to volunteer at because of HCA giving me the time to do so. Every employee is offered 24 hours of volunteer time throughout each year, as well as one designated work day, “Community Day”, where employees can get together to serve the community away from work.

IABC: If you could describe yourself in three (3) words, what would it be?

Molly: Personable, positive, and outgoing.

IABC: Tell something about yourself people would be surprised to learn.

Molly: I am a HUGE cat lady. I love cats. I was also on the bowling team in high school which not many people would expect.

IABC: What lesson(s) have you learned along the way that you believe has made you a better communications professional?

Molly: Don’t be afraid to take risks, and be confident in your ideas and your work. I have learned to be more confident over the past two years in my ID role by trial and error. Once I got more comfortable with thinking outside of the box with my ideas and my work, (and realizing that it was ok to fail), I was able to use my confidence with business owners more effectively.

IABC: What makes an effective communications leader? 

Molly: Someone who is transparent in their communication styles – they can see all sides of a situation and are open to different views and ideas. They are also great communicators because they not only speak, but they also listen. I think listening to all ideas, being aware of all views, offering fair advice, and communicating thoroughly is also what makes an effective communications leader.

IABC: What do you feel is the greatest benefit of IABC?

Molly: Meeting so many different people in the Nashville area that are involved in different industries like communications, education, instructional design, marketing, graphic design, and public relations (to name a few), and getting to know the many different faces of “communications.” This has been something that I have always wanted to get to learn more about, and can use in my everyday work. I also love getting to attend the monthly luncheons and networking with all of the different members as well. It has been eye-opening to me to see all of the different companies that use communications in many different ways in their businesses.

IABC: What prompted you to join IABC?

Molly: As I grew stronger in my role as an Instructional Designer, I also wanted to learn more about the communications side of the business. I wanted to join a professional association in Nashville, and I did a little research and found IABC. I started going to some of the luncheons and other events last year, then recently decided to join as an official member!

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April 19 IABC Nashville Lunch: Let’s Talk about Brand with Tim Earnhart


Be The Hero — The Journey of Your Brand Story

tim-earnhartStorytelling has been one of most powerful and influential forms of communication in human history. It’s the best way to draw out emotions, influence decisions, and inspire actions. The modern brand needs to be much more than visual consistency, it needs to be human. And the way to be human is to tell a great story.

The hardest part about this for businesses is getting your audience and potential customers to understand what and, more importantly, who you are. Storytelling can be a way to help your customers connect to the human side of your brand early on.

Join Tim Earnhart, founder and CEO of Werkshop Branding, at Maggiano’s on April 19 as he journeys through benchmark examples of brands that have effectively shared their story, and how you can do the same for your brand.

About Tim Earnhart

Born in Bern, Switzerland and raised in Portland, Oregon, Tim now calls the rolling hills of Kentucky home where he lives with his family.

As founder and CEO of Werkshop Branding, Tim brings 23+ years of business entrepreneurship, ownership, operations, marketing, and branding experience to the table. Tim began his career with Wendy’s Restaurants, and after 8 years launched his own branding agency. Today, Werkshop has clients across the country in multiple vertical markets and industries.

Tim also serves as an Advisor/Mentor for the Nashville Entrepreneur Center (www.ec.co).

In the last few years, Tim has become a sought-after keynote speaker on the topics of branding, brand culture and storytelling, marketing, social media, consumer behavior, entrepreneurship, life passions, and perseverance.

Tim has been active both professionally and personally with various non-profits and advisory groups, and in 2004 was chosen as the Bowling Green, KY Area Chamber of Commerce Business Person of the Year.  Tim is blessed with a wonderful and patient wife, a driven and talented daughter who is completing her freshmen year of college, and a 15 year-old son who aspires to be a PGA Tour player someday.

Join us at IABC Nashville’s April 19 Professional Development Luncheon. Connect at Maggiano’s with guest speaker Tim Earnhart, and other Mid-South communications and marketing professionals. Be seen — and see who else is in the room.

IABC is the only place to connect
with communicators globally 
 IABC Nashville is your passport!

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IABC Nashville is Named 2017 Small Chapter of the Year; Invites Area Communicators to March 15 Lunch

NASHVILLE, Tenn., March 7, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — The Nashville Chapter of the International Association of Business Communicators, which was recently named IABC’s “2017 Small Chapter of the Year,” invites communications professionals from all industries to its March 15 professional development lunch at Maggiano’s Little Italy in Nashville. Registration is now open for the 11:30 a.m.1 p.m. event.

Attendees to the March 15 event, “Expanding Your Circle of Influence,” will hear from Cheryl Read, president of Cheryl L. Read & Associates. Read, who has more than 30 years of experience in brand marketing, communications and relationship management, will share her advice on seeking out new connections, building relationships and ultimately expanding your Circle of Influence. The cost to attend is $30 for members, $40 for non-members and $25 for students.

Throughout her corporate and financial experience, Read spent 29 years with Tennessee-based HCA, the nation’s leading provider of healthcare services. Her responsibilities included all division communications, marketing management, diversity and inclusion and community relations at HCA working specifically with the hospitals located in Tennessee, Kentucky, Indiana, Virginia, and Georgia.

IABC Nashville won the 2017 Small Chapter of the Year award at the Feb. 23 International Association of Business Communicator’s 2017 Chapter Management Awards in Dallas, Texas. Additionally, the chapter won two Chapter Management Awards (CMAs) in the categories of Event Management and Communication Management.

This year’s accolades were due in large part to the chapter’s efforts to communicate the rebranding of its Music City Gold Pen Awards and organization of the awards gala that was held in May at the Oak Room at Greenbrier Distillery. This is the chapter’s second consecutive year of being recognized for Chapter Management achievement. In 2016, IABC Nashville’s efforts to incorporate new branding to align with the association’s new guidelines earned the chapter a CMA in Communication Management.

“IABC is the only place where professional communicators can connect globally network, and we are proud to be a part of that network,” said IABC Nashville President Tom Kenley. “These projects required a lot of hard work and dedication over the past few years, and we are especially proud that IABC recognized those efforts.”

ABOUT IABC NASHVILLE
IABC/Nashville is one of more than 100 chapters in 70 countries providing learning opportunities for its members and professional development sessions that offer new insights into the latest communication trends, technology and issues facing the industry. The chapter is diverse, with members representing area agencies, broadcast stations, corporations, universities and nonprofit organizations. IABC/Nashville also offers ties to job bank services and the annual ‘Gold Pen’ communication awards program. To learn more visit nashville.iabc.com.

SOURCE IABC Nashville

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Connect at the Music City Gold Pen Awards Celebration May 18!

Want to celebrate with the stars?

Alanna Autler

Communications stars, that is! The Music City Gold Pen Awards are an annual awards ceremony honoring the best communications projects and professionals in middle MC-Gold-PensTennessee and southern Kentucky. IABC Nashville is proud to announce our 2017 event. With over 25 awards categories, ranging from complex communications campaigns to single news articles (and much more!) You’ll get to celebrate with the star communications professionals and learn about their award-winning projects! And, connect with Alanna Autler, WSMV-TV’s, Channel 4 News I-Team award-winning investigative reporter, who will be presenting this year’s awards.

What can you gain from attending?

Even if you decided not to submit an entry for evaluation, the Music City Gold Pen Awards ceremony is an event you won’t want to miss. Here’s why you need to be there:

  • Opportunity to mix and mingle with leaders in communications, public relations, marketing, and from middle Tennessee and Kentucky
  • Learn about the award-winning communications projects and what made them successful.
  • Exclusive insight about current communications trends, best practices, and how the industry’s stars are shaping our field for the future.
  • An evening of great networking, complete with delicious food as well as beer and wine for you to enjoy.

Come. Connect. Celebrate.

Thursday, May 18, 2017 / 6 to 8 p.m.noahliff1

Noah Liff Opera Center

$45 for members / $55 for non-members

Deadline for registration is May 15

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Interested in becoming a sponsor? Click here to learn how.

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 IABC is the only place to connect with communicators globally.

Connect Here. Go Anywhere!

Thanks to our sponsors

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Event photography generously provided by:

Bernadette Ruby

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Principle-Centered Careers: Is it Still Possible?

By Philip J. Matisak, ABC, Past President, IABC Nashville

IMG_0054-001During a recent visit to Western Kentucky University, several members of the IABC Nashville Board of Directors visited with students to talk about what they could do with their degrees.  Many of the questions were about what a typical day is like in a variety of different jobs or professions—how can you find a job that is satisfying and offers growth, both personally and for careers? What would we do differently? Great questions.

There seemed to be a theme that surfaced regarding the advice that these seasoned professionals were giving. Whether it was from some of us who had been in several jobs over the years, or someone like me, who had been at one company for a career, we all seemed to agree—find a company or field of work that is in sync with your values and principles.

It’s no secret that not everyone can fit comfortably into any given company’s culture. Hiring and recruiting would be snap if that were the case. The challenge is finding your “right fit.” How do you do that? Sometimes it’s trial and error. But that can waste value career time at the wrong company or the wrong job. You could even be in the right company but the wrong job.

A starting place is understanding or discovering exactly what are your primary values. That might take some soul searching, some honesty and some work to really analyze what’s important in your life. And perhaps, as important is what makes those things important?

*Stan Slap, business management guru, would ask, “What was the Moment of Truth” when you knew this was an important value? A life-changing incident? Some call it an “ah-ha” moment. Does that mean some tragedy or near-death experience? Not necessarily. It’s simply an experience, observation or event when it struck you—Wow, this is real important to me!

You may not realize what that moment is at the time, but on reflection—when trying to figure out what drives your decision-making—you can see why a certain value or principle seems to impact your decisions. You realize, “ah-ha, yes!” this observation or experience is important—when I saw my new born baby or grandbaby, I knew family would be first in my life. Or, when I saw a lack of integrity which some people displayed, and how hurtful or counter-productive that could be to people and business— integrity would direct my life and decisions.

So, you’ve figured out what’s important. Now, in this world of “evil corporations,” is it possible to work for a company or clients that accepts and supports people who don’t leave their values at the front door and who speak up for what is right—and more importantly perhaps, one who listens, beyond rank and regardless of level of responsibility?

You may be surprised at the number of companies who do. In fact, most successful companies understand that principled employee engagement is critical to the success of the hundreds or thousands of people who come together for a common cause—a corporation—for the “good” of employees, communities, and environment.

David Koch, founder of Koch Industries, calls it “Good Profit,” the title of his recent book. It outlines how their company’s success is driven by a governing principle that not only rewards principled-centered people within their company, “people who help themselves by helping others improve their lives,” but actively recruits people based on values and principles first, skills second. He says people create “good profit” by “…creating superior value to customers while consuming fewer resources and always acting lawfully and with integrity…Good profit comes from making a contribution in society.” I was privileged to work at a company with similar values.

Is it possible to find a principle-centered career? Yes. How can you find these companies and careers? Talk to people work at potential employers and in those potential jobs – aka, network. A few weeks ago, I reviewed a resume for someone I met at an IABC luncheon. She recently introduced me to another person recently moved to Nashville, with whom I met, and we talked about many other people she should meet as she explores job and career opportunities in the area.

You never know which person will connect you to just the right person that will connect you to your dream job and career. They say we all know each other within six degrees. I’ve found that to be true at many times throughout the years. But you’ll never know that unless you really talk to people – and work your network.

We say, IABC is the only place to connect with communcators globally. We believe IABC Nashville is your passport! IABC is one great way to work your network. Over the nearly 35 years I’ve been a member, I’ve received a hundredfold return on my investment. I hope you have the opportunity to do the same. I’d be glad to help.

*Stan Slap is founder of SLAP.  I participated in a workshop facilitated by Stan called: I Left My Heart in Conference Room B. It was life-changing for me and how I lived and managed henceforth. I highly recommend his book by the same name. The fact that the workshop was provided by my company as management development spoke volumes to me about the company’s values and principles, and solidified in mind that they were in sync with mine.

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