Membership Spotlight – Mollye Dietrich

On a continuous basis, IABC Nashville spotlights its diverse members through a Q&A feature. We are pleased to showcase Mollye Dietrich, an instructional designer at HCA.

mollye-dietrich_hcaIABC: What is your background?

Molly: I was born and raised in Nashville, TN (yes, I am not a “transplant!”). I went to Franklin High School, then attended the University of Tennessee-Knoxville for college (and am a HUGE Vols fan!). I received a Bachelor of Science in Service Management with a major in Retail and Consumer Science, and a minor in Business Administration. I moved back to Nashville the day after I graduated in 2011, and haven’t left again since.

IABC: How did you get started in this business?

Molly: My first job in Nashville after college was in retail (since that is what I studied in undergrad), but I quickly realized that this was not a long-term career for me, although I love everything about fashion. I decided to move to a job in IT sales, which I also soon realized wasn’t the right fit for me either. A friend of mine knew that I was unhappy with my job, and encouraged me to apply for something completely out of my comfort zone, which happened to be the best decision I ever made. I started with HCA (Hospital Corporation of America) in 2012 as an Implementation Specialist, traveling to different hospitals across the U.S implementing our paperless Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems. After that, I was an Assistant Project Manager for a short period of time and learned all of the ropes of a project from beginning to end, including the communications and education role of a project. I decided that I wanted to try something a little more creative, and interviewed for an Instructional Designer position, and here I am today!

IABC: What is your current position and business affiliation? How long have you been in this role?

Molly: My current role is an Instructional Designer with HCA. I have been in this position for almost 2 years, however, I have been with HCA for almost 5 years. As an ID, I create communication and education deliverables for different projects across my specific department at HCA, the Clinical Services Group (CSG). This includes (to name a few) web-based training courses, communication and marketing strategies, branding, toolkits, brochures, posters, facilitator and learner guides, podcasts, and tip-sheets.

IABC: What makes your business/organization stand out?

Molly: HCA is the biggest healthcare company in the world, with ownership of over 165 hospitals and 115 surgery centers in the U.S and London, England, as well as over 205,000 employees. With a company this large, it seems that it would be easy to get “lost in the shuffle.” However, that is not the case at HCA. Every employee is treated with dignity and respect, and their work portrays the mission and values of HCA everyday – “Above all else, we are committed to the care and improvement of human life.” It is also amazing to me how involved in the community the organization is, especially since the corporate office is right here in Nashville. There are so many local non-profits that I have gotten to volunteer at because of HCA giving me the time to do so. Every employee is offered 24 hours of volunteer time throughout each year, as well as one designated work day, “Community Day”, where employees can get together to serve the community away from work.

IABC: If you could describe yourself in three (3) words, what would it be?

Molly: Personable, positive, and outgoing.

IABC: Tell something about yourself people would be surprised to learn.

Molly: I am a HUGE cat lady. I love cats. I was also on the bowling team in high school which not many people would expect.

IABC: What lesson(s) have you learned along the way that you believe has made you a better communications professional?

Molly: Don’t be afraid to take risks, and be confident in your ideas and your work. I have learned to be more confident over the past two years in my ID role by trial and error. Once I got more comfortable with thinking outside of the box with my ideas and my work, (and realizing that it was ok to fail), I was able to use my confidence with business owners more effectively.

IABC: What makes an effective communications leader? 

Molly: Someone who is transparent in their communication styles – they can see all sides of a situation and are open to different views and ideas. They are also great communicators because they not only speak, but they also listen. I think listening to all ideas, being aware of all views, offering fair advice, and communicating thoroughly is also what makes an effective communications leader.

IABC: What do you feel is the greatest benefit of IABC?

Molly: Meeting so many different people in the Nashville area that are involved in different industries like communications, education, instructional design, marketing, graphic design, and public relations (to name a few), and getting to know the many different faces of “communications.” This has been something that I have always wanted to get to learn more about, and can use in my everyday work. I also love getting to attend the monthly luncheons and networking with all of the different members as well. It has been eye-opening to me to see all of the different companies that use communications in many different ways in their businesses.

IABC: What prompted you to join IABC?

Molly: As I grew stronger in my role as an Instructional Designer, I also wanted to learn more about the communications side of the business. I wanted to join a professional association in Nashville, and I did a little research and found IABC. I started going to some of the luncheons and other events last year, then recently decided to join as an official member!

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Membership Spotlight – Sarah Loeffler

On a continuous basis, IABC Nashville spotlights its diverse members through a Q&A feature. We are pleased to showcase Sarah Loeffler, Content Manager at Tanner Corporate Services.

 

sarah-loeffler-headshotIABC: What is your background?

Sarah: I received my Bachelor of Arts in English, with a concentration in technical writing, and through that, was able to experience different types of jobs in communication. My background is in technical writing, editing, journalism, training, performance support, leadership development, content management, content strategy, and knowledge management consulting.

 

IABC: How did you get started in this business?

Sarah: Being an avid reader and writer, this profession came somewhat naturally to me. At a very basic level, working with words and crafting the perfect sentence or paragraph has continued to challenge and fascinate me throughout my life. The real starting point of my career was in college when I worked for a literacy agency to help them document and publish their internal training processes and materials. Moving into knowledge management and content management was a logical progression when I moved to Nashville shortly after graduation.

 

IABC: What is your current position and business affiliation? How long have you been in this role?

Sarah: My current position is Content Manager at Tanner Corporate Services. I have served in this role for a year, and have worked at Tanner for three years. I am our chief content coordinator and am responsible for the development and delivery of client materials. I manage our contracted authors and work directly with clients to evaluate, document, and improve their company’s content, for both print and digital formats.

 

IABC: What makes your business/organization stand out?

Sarah: At Tanner, we work closely with our clients to capitalize on the valuable organizational knowledge their employees possess, an often overlooked asset. We provide practical communication strategies and solutions to support client business objectives. We capture, organize, and distribute organizational knowledge to the right people at the right time to help employees make better decisions and customers experience products and services as intended. We mine what client employees know and shape it for distribution to targeted groups of employees and customers. Managing organizational knowledge has never been more important than in this age of information. As consultants, we bring clear vision and fresh perspective to content dilemmas. As technical writers, we have the expertise and technology to strengthen and enhance content deliverables.

 

IABC: If you could describe yourself in three (3) words, what would it be?

Sarah: Compassionate – Driven – Adventurous

 

IABC: Tell something about yourself people would be surprised to learn.

Sarah: One of my passions is singing in choirs. I have traveled to Austria, Germany, Ireland, and Italy with various touring choirs, and most recently this past year, I performed at Carnegie Hall in New York City.

 

IABC: What lesson(s) have you learned along the way that you believe has made you a better communications professional?

Sarah: Some of the most valuable lessons I have learned include the ability to blend creativity with conventionalism, keeping an open mind, knowing your audience, and not making assumptions. Effective communication is more than good copywriting, it’s about expanding and broadening the ways you communicate and the tools you use to communicate so that your messages arrive clearly, concisely, and conveniently.

 

IABC: What makes an effective communications leader?

Sarah: An effective communications leader needs to have a deep understanding of people and the ability to connect with people through the words and images they use to produce a desired outcome. An effective communicator is a problem solver. They understand the lessons and rules of the past and remain abreast of current trends to find the most suitable solution for the communication need.

 

IABC: What do you feel is the greatest benefit of IABC?

Sarah: The greatest benefits of IABC are the networking and professional development aspects. The members are friendly and knowledgeable, and the guest speakers are inspiring and enlightening. The relationships I’ve built as a result of IABC have been invaluable to my career development. Also, being able to experience the current happenings of this growing, changing city through the lens of communications has equipped me to excel both professionally and personally.

 

IABC: What prompted you to join IABC?

Sarah: I was new to my career and new to the Nashville area, and wanted to gain some professional development opportunities beyond those available to me at the organization I work for. Being at a small company, it’s easy to get stuck in our little bubble, so I wanted to meet other professionals in similar fields. Beth Tanner, the owner and president of Tanner Corporate Services, spoke highly of IABC and suggested it to me, even took me to a few luncheons. I had attended meetings with several other networking groups in Nashville and felt the most “at home” with IABC. This year, I was thrilled to have the opportunity to help plan IABC Nashville’s re-launch of the Music City Gold Pen Awards event.

 

 

 

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Membership Spotlight – Nicole Miller

On a continuous basis, IABC Nashville spotlights its diverse members through a Q&A feature. We are pleased to showcase Nicole Miller, senior manager of Public Relations at Asurion.

Nicole Headshot - smIABC: What is your background?

Miller: I’ve had a passion for news since I was young, serving as an editor of my high school newspaper and editor-in-chief of the year book. I received my Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison (go Badgers!), where I majored in Journalism with an emphasis in news writing and public relations. My first job after college was working as a general assignment reporter for a community newspaper in Wisconsin. While there, I learned a lot about what makes a compelling news story and delivering the news under tight deadlines.

IABC: How did you get started in this business?

Miller: I started my PR career at a firm in Milwaukee that specializes in B2B marketing communications. When my main client merged with a national retailer, I was totally bit by the consumer bug and moved to Chicago, where I worked in the consumer PR for a variety of major agencies. I’m a rare PR egg in that I have gained strong experience and expertise in both consumer and B2B PR.

IABC: What is your current position and business affiliation? How long have your been in this role?

Miller: I currently serve as Senior Manager of Public Relations at Asurion, a global leader in technology protection and support, based in Nashville. My role has been evolving since I joined the company a little over a year ago, but ultimately I’ll be focusing on external corporate PR to help elevate awareness of Asurion’s leadership position within the industry and with national business media.

IABC: What makes your business/organization stand out?

Miller: Asurion is the global leader in helping customers enhance their life through their technology through ongoing support and protection. Among our continuous innovation is that we’re hyper focused on disrupting the tech support category with world-class customer experience by providing instant access to tech experts to help solve any tech issue with an Asurion covered device. There’s no waiting on hold, no transfers and a near 100 percent resolution rate in one call or chat.

IABC: If you could describe yourself in three (3) words, what would it be?

Miller: Strategic. Curious. Collaborative.

IABC: Tell something about yourself people would be surprised to learn.

Miller: My husband and I moved to Nashville from Chicago to be closer to our hobby of caving. Tennessee has more than 10,000 caves, and the tri-state region of Tennessee, Alabama and Georgia is a mecca for caving within the United States.

Caving offers a little bit of everything – the beauty and wonder of nature; great physical challenges and an intense teamwork structure. It’s quite common to put your life in your team members’ hands when caving, so trust and team dynamic are vital to the experience.

IABC: What lesson(s) have you learned along the way that you believe has made you a better communications professional?

Miller:

  • The Communications function is most effective when it closely supports the organization’s key objectives.
  • Make your communications goals actionable and measurable.
  • Don’t drink the Kool-Aid. The usual marketing messages rarely resonate with earned media or within social media.
  • Become an expert in your organization’s (or clients’) industry.
  • Stay current on new communication channels and tactics

IABC: What makes an effective communications leader?

Miller:

  • Mastery of communications channels and tactics.
  • Being up-to-date on the issues, challenges and opportunities within your organization and greater industry.
  • Serving as a trusted advisor to your leadership and team.
  • Curiosity and openness to trying new things as the communications landscape continuous to evolve.

IABC: What do you feel is the greatest benefit of IABC?

Miller: I know it’s been said before, but networking and professional development are some of the greatest benefits for me personally.

IABC: What prompted you to join IABC?

Miller: Being new to Nashville, I joined IABC to network and get immersed within the communications community locally. I heard that the Nashville IABC chapter was the most active group for local communications professionals.

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Member Spotlight – Lysa Rigo

On a continuous basis, IABC Nashville spotlights its diverse members through a Q&A feature. We are pleased to showcase Lysa Rigo, Director, HR & Creative Services at Ingram Barge Company. Lysa and her team recently won their first Music City Gold Pen Award of Excellence for Internal Communications.

Lysa RigoIABC: What is your background? How did you get started in this business?

Rigo: After earning a master’s degree in English at Northern Illinois University, I taught Composition and Business Writing (that’s where I found my passion) for five years. Following that, I gained experience as a technical writer for a mathematical and engineering software firm, and used some of those years to start a small business writing for other businesses who couldn’t afford a writer on staff.

In the mid-1990s, my family moved to Brazil, so I used the opportunity to teach English as a foreign language. When we returned to the States in 2000, I found a job teaching English to students who came to the US solely to improve their English. That enriching experience gained me friends from all over the world, and that’s where I was on 9/11, helping a large group of frightened foreigners try to make sense of something none of us could wrap our minds around.

In the mid-2000s, we moved to Tennessee for my husband’s job. A series of situations led me into a career in human resources where I had to quickly learn how to hire, fire, do payroll and worker’s comp in a plant that was scheduled to shut its doors in nine months. On the last day, I stood alone with the plant manager in an empty building and was faced with the decision of accepting the HR job I was offered or the Communications Specialist role? Communications tugged at my heart, and here I am today.

IABC: What is your current position and business affiliation? How long have you been in this role?

Rigo: I came to Ingram Barge Company 10 years ago to build a Communications department. Today, I am Director, HR & Creative Services. My team does all Corporate Communications and all things creative: web, social, magazines, photos, videos, and many random projects.

IABC: What makes your business/organization stand out?

Rigo: Barging is a silent industry so it doesn’t necessarily stand out, but Ingram does all things with excellence so we’re looked to as the standard on the inland river system; we’re the ones to imitate, the company to work for.

IABC: If you could describe yourself in three (3) words, what would they be?

Rigo: Empathetic, resilient, and instinctive

IABC: Tell something about yourself people would be surprised to learn.

Rigo: Probably not surprising, but I became fluent in Portuguese while living in Brazil.

IABC: What lesson(s) have you learned along the way that you believe has made you a better communications professional? What makes an effective communications leader?

Rigo:

  • What I’ve been working on the past year is that it’s OK not to be perfect; none of us are. Details are critical in communications, but it’s so important to let go and let the message shine more loudly than the form.
  • When there are mistakes, don’t beat yourself up over them. Fix them, if needed, and walk proudly forward. So what if the whole organization sees your daily work? Most people will give you grace, so don’t listen to the few who find joy in the “got-yas.”
  • You need to learn from the younger professionals in the field. They may not know all there is in the politics, strategy or big picture, but they know what they want to hear so they will have good ideas for connecting with others like them.

IABC: What do you feel is the greatest benefit of IABC? What prompted you to join IABC?

Rigo: After developing our Creative Services department, I spent a seven-year hiatus with a focus more on HR than communications, A few years ago, I got a new boss and a reshuffling of duties, and Creative Services became my major focus again. I needed to connect with communications professionals, and Google led me to IABC. I walked into my first meeting and knew I was in the right place. These people get me, and I get them. Everything else is just icing on the cake.

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Member Spotlight – Paul Lindsley

On a continuous basis, IABC Nashville spotlights its diverse members through a Q&A feature. We are pleased to showcase Paul Lindsley, ABC, director of public relations at Phase 3 Marketing and Communications in Nashville. Paul currently serves as a vice president-at-large for IABC Nashville and serves on the IABC’s Southern Regional Board of Directors as their vice president of chapter relations.

Paul Lindsley head shotIABC: What is your background?

LINDSLEY: After earning a Bachelor of Science in broadcast journalism, I began my career in TV news working as a photographer, reporter, producer and assignment manager at WAAY TV in Huntsville, Ala., and then assignment manager at Fox 13 in Memphis, Tenn.. After more than eight years in TV news, I decided to transition to public relations.

I started my PR career at Opryland Hotels/Gaylord Entertainment as their senior manager of communications promoting the Nashville property, as well as pre-opening PR efforts for Gaylord Hotels in Florida, Texas and Washington D.C. I then went on to Saint Thomas Hospital where I served as the director of communications for 10 years. In September 2011, I began working at HealthStream in Nashville as their communications manager, but after 14 months, I was recruited by Sullivan Branding to start a PR division in their Nashville agency office.

I received my Master of Arts in Corporate Communication from Austin Peay State University and have been an Adjunct Professor for Austin Peay State University since 2009.

IABC: What is your current position and business affiliation? How long have your been in this role?

LINDSLEY: Prior to being named director of public relations at Phase 3 Marketing & Communications in Nashville, I served as vice president of public relations at Sullivan Branding, a full service communications, branding, marketing and public relations agency in Nashville and Memphis for nearly three years. In September 2015, Phase 3 acquired Sullivan Branding Nashville.

IABC: What makes your business/organization stand out?

LINDSLEY: With offices in Atlanta, Charleston, Charlotte, Dallas, and Nashville, Phase 3 Marketing & Communications is a leading provider of marketing services and solutions from IDEATION to EXECUTION to corporations throughout the United States. Instead of companies having multiple vendors for marketing, PR, social media, website development, branding and printing, we provide all of those services representing brands with integrated marketing solutions.

IABC:  If you could describe yourself in three (3) words, what would it be?

LINDSLEY:  Storyteller, Promoter, Experienced

IABC:  Tell something about yourself people would be surprised to learn.

LINDSLEY:  As a reporter in Huntsville, Ala., I had the opportunity to interview the commander of the Space Shuttle Columbia while he was in space.

IABC:  What lesson(s) have you learned along the way that you believe has made you a better communications professional?

  • You don’t know everything, you never will.
  • Be a good listener, it’s essential to getting the whole picture.
  • While I was at Opryland Hotel, we had a service promise mantra which I still use today. When I reply to client’s requests, I state, “Consider it done.” There’s nothing more impactful than keeping a promise.
  • Be kind, always.

IABC:  What makes an effective communications leader?

LINDSLEY:  Someone who listens, helps determine messages and audiences. Leaders promote, protect and publicize other’s good works.

IABC:  What do you feel is the greatest benefit of IABC?

LINDSLEY:  There are many benefits, networking on an international level, education, learning from other’s good efforts, tools to advance your career and a professional standard to live by.

IABC:  What prompted you to join IABC?

LINDSLEY:  In every PR job I have ever had I have been responsible for internal, external, PR, media relations, community relations, reputation management and crisis communication. No other professional organization meets all of my needs as a communications professional. IABC members are often a one-man-band, and the variety of development and leadership opportunities across the communications career field are critical to success.

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